Multimedia Gallery - The Hydrologic Cycle


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The Hydrologic Cycle



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ID # 9

The Hydrologic Cycle
Soil properties such as texture, structure, and the nature of the pores have a great influence on water movement through soil.

STEM Standard addressed: ESS2C - The Roles of Water in Earth’s Surface Processes


Appropriate Grade Level(s)
  • 6-8
  • 9-12
  • College-level
Materials are best used for
  • Classroom Lectures
  • Distance Education Classes
  • Extension Presentations
  • Website Information
General Course Areas
  • Introduction to Soil Science
Description
From a soil's perspective, the water cycle begins with rain falling on the soil surface where it can soak in (infiltrate), run off the soil surface, or evaporate. Water that infiltrates moves downward through the soil pore spaces. In the root zone, water that is absorbed by roots moves through the plant to the leaves, where it is given to the atmosphere as water vapor via evapotranspiration. In the atmosphere, water vapor condenses into clouds, then forms water droplets that fall back to the soil surface as rain, sleet, snow, hail, and dew. Water not used by plants continues to move through the soil flowing laterally--eventually surfacing as a spring or seep-- or downward, eventually recharging the groundwater. Precipitation that does not infiltrate moves across the surface as runoff, eventually entering streams, rivers, and ultimately the ocean. Water that infiltrates moves downward through the soil pore spaces. In the root zone, water that is absorbed by roots moves through the plant to the leaves, where it is given off to the atmosphere as water vapor via evapotranspiration. In the atmosphere, water vapor condenses into clouds, then forms water droplets that fall back to the soil surface as rain, sleet, snow, hail, and dew. Water not used by plants continues to move through the soil flowing laterally—eventually surfacing as a spring or seep—or downward, eventually recharging the groundwater.

Peer Review: Yes

Credit this item to: Know Soil Know Life, SSSA
Media Date: 2015-12-01
Provided By: Susan Chapman


Author(s)/Creator(s)

  • * Know Soil Know Life
    SSSA

Submitted By: Ms. Jenna LaFave


Keywords

  • Know Soil Know Life

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