Congressional Science Fellowship


The Congressional Science Fellowship Program is unique opportunity for Society members with an interest in working at the intersection of science and government. For almost 30 years, a graduate student member has been selected to spend one year in Washington D.C. applying his/her professional and scientific expertise as a special assistant on the staff of a member of Congress or Congressional committee. 

Even though very few members of Congress have a science background, many of the issues they deal with are deeply rooted in science, technology and research. Fellows are an invaluable part of the policy process, using their scientific expertise to inform and shape policy decisions. They make real contributions to the effective use of science and technical knowledge in government, while also providing information to the scientific and educational communities about public policy and the legislative process. 

As the Congressional Science Fellow you could be a part of this exciting legacy. The Fellowship provides first-hand experience in the legislative process, an expanded network in both the policy and scientific spheres and new communication skills. Consider using your scientific knowledge in a whole new way as the next Congressional Science Fellow.

The Congressional Science Fellowship is a joint program of the Soil Science Society of America, American Society of Agronomy, and Crop Science Society of America.

 

Learn more about the application process and details about eligibility.

 

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Meet the Fellows


  • Jennifer Burks, 2014
    • Sen. Mazie Hirono
  • Samantha Shoaf, 2013
    • Sen. John Thune 
  • Karen Heymann, 2012
    • Rep. Lois Capps 
  • Shannon Heuberger, 2011
    • Sen. Jeff Merkley 
  • Julie DeMeester, 2010
    • Sen. Dick Durbin 
  • Leah Shanely, 2009
    • Sen. Bill Nelson 
  • Ben Gutman, 2008
    • Rep. Doris Mastui 
  • Marcy Gallo, 2007
    • Sen. Joe Lieberman 
  • Katharine Batten, 2006
    • Sen. Joe Lieberman 
  • Melissa Ho, 2005
    • Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton