Classroom - Classes


Manure Mgmt-You're Up the Creek, Do You Have a Paddle? Webinar Series

Manure and effluent management are big deals for animal feeding operations; the bigger the operation, the bigger deal it is. This series will address
Distinctions between Animal feeding operations (AFOs) and Concentrated Feeding Operations (CAFOs)

Nutrient Management Plans/Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans required

Manure and effluent utilization and management integrating 4Rs, and long-term effects

Air and water quality issues associated with AFOs/CAFOs and with manure/effluent application

CEUs:
CCA/CPAg:  
Addressing Air Quality Concerns for Land Application of Manure and Wastewater (1.0 Nutrient Management)
AFOs and CAFOs. Manures, Effluents and Nutrient Content (Source/Rate) (0.5 Nutrient Management and 0.5 Professional Development)
Long-term Manure Additions, Pathogens and Antibiotic Resistance (1.0 Soil and Water Management)
Vegetative Treatment Systems (1.0 Nutrient Management)

CPSS/CPSC/CST:  1.0 Professional Meeting CEU per webinar

$90.00 Members/Certified Professionals
$144.00 Non-members

Included webinars in this series package are:
Addressing Air Quality Concerns for Land Application of Manure and Wastewater
AFOs and CAFOs, Manures, Effluents and Nutrient Content (Source/Rate)
Long-term Manure Additions, Pathogens, and Antibiotic Resistance
Vegetative Treatment Systems

Each webinar may also be purchased individually by clicking on the individual title below.   A series bundle purchase provides a discount.

You have 30 days to view this content after purchase.

Self-Paced

If you are enrolled in this class, please log in to see the class materials.

Class cost: $ 144.00

Add to Cart

 

Addressing Air Quality Concerns for Land Application of Manure and Wastewater

In this webinar, we will discuss air quality concerns with the land application of manure and wastewater.  As houses encroach upon rural areas once used strictly for crop production, there is a pressing need to address odor and air quality impacts.  The webinar will focus on two primary subjects:  1) the science of measuring and quantifying odor and air quality impacts, and 2) best management practices for reducing odor and ammonia emissions from the land application of manure and wastewater.

CEUs:
CCA/CPAg:  1.0 Nutrient Management
CPSS/CPSC/CST:  1.0 Professional Meeting

Speaker Information:
Dr. David Parker
Research Agricultural Engineer
USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory

Dr. Parker is a Research Agricultural Engineer with the USDA-ARS in Bushland, Texas. He is a registered Professional Engineer with 27 years of experience specializing in air quality and manure management associated with animal feeding operations. His work experience includes 16 years as a Professor at West Texas A&M University, where he taught courses and conducted research in Agricultural Waste Management.  He also managed the university odor and GC/MS laboratories.

$25.00 Members/Certified Professionals
$40.00 Non-members

You have 30 days to view this content after purchase.

Self-Paced

CEUs

Nutrient Management   1.0
Professional Meetings (PM)   1.0

If you are enrolled in this class, please log in to see the class materials.

Class cost: $ 40.00

Add to Cart

 

AFOs and CAFOs, Manures, Effluents and Nutrient Content (Source/Rate)

Animal feeding operations, concentrated animal feeding operations, and confined animal feeding operations are defined by size and management, and have different requirements for nutrient management plans.

Some standard information on nutrient concentrations of manures and effluents from several species will be presented, with some generalizations about nutrient availability in the first and subsequent years.

CEUs:
CCA/CPAg:  0.5 Nutrient Management and 0.5 Professional Development
CPSS/CPSC/CST:  1.0 Professional Meeting

Speaker Information:
Dr. Clay Robinson, PhD, CPSS, PG
Education Manager
American Society of Agronomy and Soil Science Society of America

Clay Robinson earned BS and MS degrees from West Texas State University, with a concentration in plant science/agronomy, and a PhD in Soil Management from Iowa State University. He is a Certified Professional Soil Scientist and former professor who taught soil science and agronomy courses at two universities from 1992 to 2011. He is published on the beneficial use of manure as a by-product, and on the capacity of three counties in the Texas High Plains to utilize for crop production all the nitrogen and phosphorus excreted in manure by the approximately 2 million feeder cattle. He supervised graduate students in research addressing the chemical and physical properties of soil and effects on crop yields after long-term applications of manure and effluent. He also worked with a CCA to evaluate field records of several producers of N from soil nitrate tests, stalk nitrate tests, and N fertilizer and manure applications on crop yields.

$25.00 Members/Certified Professionals
$40.00 Non-members

You have 30 days to view this content after purchase.

Self-Paced

CEUs

Nutrient Management   0.5
Professional Development   0.5
Professional Meetings (PM)   1.0

If you are enrolled in this class, please log in to see the class materials.

Class cost: $ 40.00

Add to Cart

 

Long-term Manure Additions: Pathogens, and Antibiotic Resistance

Livestock manure is a valuable nutrient source for crop production and soil conditioning. Long-term manure additions affect the total pool of soil organic matter and nutrient supply, which depends upon the mineralization rate. There are also effects on soil physical, chemical and biological properties. Dr. Robinson will discuss the nature of these long-term effects.

However, land application of livestock manures without prior treatment and/or in areas with intensive animal production may be a route of plant, soil or water contamination with manure-associated bacteria. Dr. Cook will provide an overview of the state-of the science and future directions (research and policy) with regards to pathogens and antibiotic resistance associated with agro-ecosystems, and discuss research conducted to characterize how naturally occurring populations of pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and bacteria with antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) respond in soils with applied manures. Results and implications for land and manure management will be discussed.

CEUs:
CCA/CPAg:  1.0 Soil and Water Management
CPSS/CPSC/CST:  1.0 Professional Meetings

Speaker Information:
Kimberly Cook, PhD

Dr. Kimberly Cook is a research microbiologist that has been with the USDA ARS since 2003. She conducts applied, interdisciplinary research on the microbiology of animal wastes; evaluating microbiological and ecological processes responsible for the survival and spread of pathogens and antibiotic resistant bacteria through plant, soil and water agro-ecosystems. She obtained her PhD in Microbiology from the University of Tennessee.

Clay Robinson, PhD, CPSS, PG

Clay Robinson earned BS and MS degrees from West Texas State University, with a concentration in plant science/agronomy, and a PhD in Soil Management from Iowa State University. He is a Certified Professional Soil Scientist and former professor who taught soil science and agronomy courses at two universities from 1992 to 2011. He is published on the beneficial use of manure as a by-product, and on the capacity of three counties in the Texas High Plains to utilize for crop production all the nitrogen and phosphorus excreted in manure by the approximately 2 million feeder cattle. He supervised graduate students in research addressing the chemical and physical properties of soil and effects on crop yields after long-term applications of manure and effluent. He also worked with a CCA to evaluate field records of several producers of N from soil nitrate tests, stalk nitrate tests, and N fertilizer and manure applications on crop yields.

$25.00 Members/Certified Professionals
$40.00 Non-members

Self-Paced

CEUs

Soil & Water Management   1.0
Professional Meetings (PM)   1.0

If you are enrolled in this class, please log in to see the class materials.

Class cost: $ 40.00

Add to Cart

 

Vegetative Treatment Systems

Vegetative treatment systems (VTS) offer animal producers an alternative to large holding ponds for treating runoff from open lot systems.  The VTS is designed with the purpose of treating nutrients in the runoff, but runoff from cattle feedlots may also include fecal indicator microorganisms, pathogens, and pharmaceutical compounds.  How these particular constituents break down, accumulate, or move within the VTS is only now being determined.  This webinar will present the results from a three year study at a VTS site in central Nebraska receiving feedlot runoff.

CEUs:
CCA/CPAg:  1.0 Nutrient Management
CPSS/CPSC/CST:  1.0 Professional Meeting

Speaker Information:
Dr. Dan Miller
Research Scientist
USDA-ARS

Dr. Dan Miller grew up on a small farm near Kansas City and became interested in environmental chemistry and microbiology during his undergraduate studies at the University of Kansas.  In graduate school at Cornell University and afterword in a postdoctoral position with the US Geological Survey, Dr. Miller researched microbes and their impact on gas fluxes and ground water contamination.  Dr. Miller joined the USDA in 1998 and has worked at Clay Center’s Meat Animal Research Center and in the Agroecosystem Management Research Unit in Lincoln, NE where he studies a variety of manure-associated environmental issues including gas and odor emissions, nutrient transformation and losses, and the potential for antibiotics in manure to affect soil processes.

$25.00 Members/Certified Professionals
$40.00 Non-members

You have 30 days to view this content after purchase.

Self-Paced

CEUs

Nutrient Management   1.0
Professional Meetings (PM)   1.0

If you are enrolled in this class, please log in to see the class materials.

Class cost: $ 40.00

Add to Cart